Dec 152012
 

Growing Asparagus and Rhubarb @ Common Sense Homesteading

It’s that time of year – no, not Christmas, it the time when the seed catalogs start coming in the mail! While you brainstorm next year’s plantings, consider growing asparagus and rhubarb.  Because these perennials live for years, they are worth the time investment.  They often provide the first garden harvest of the year.  You may not even need to plant asparagus, as it grows wild in some places.

If you’ve never had fresh picked asparagus  – steamed, stir fried, or even raw – you’ve missed how good asparagus can be.  I would say the flavor is kind of like snap peas, but different in a good way. Here in northwest Wisconsin it grows wild in places, along fence lines and under power lines where birds plant the seeds after they eat the fruit during the summer. The mature plants are the easiest to spot along roads and walking sunny fence lines. You can map them out and then come back in the spring. This is what last year’s mature plants look like: Continue reading »

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May 212012
 

Rhubarbade - An Easy Drink That You Can Sweeten with Sugar or Stevia

Do you have an abundance of fresh rhubarb, or maybe some leftover rhubarb in the freezer?  Here’s a quick and easy way to use some up and get in some of those rhubarb health benefits.  Yes – rhubarb is good for you!  Read on.  :-)

This recipe is adapted from the book From Asparagus to Zucchini:  A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce.  It’s one of my “go to” recipe books when fresh produce is in abundance, along with The Garden Fresh Vegetable Cookbook and Too Many TomatoesFrom Asparagus to Zucchini also gives storage and cooking tips, as well as background information on the produce.  It was created by the Madison Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition. Continue reading »

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May 152012
 

Old Fashioned Rhubarb Pudding Cake @ Common Sense Homesteading

I was looking for something a little different to do with the rhubarb bounty this year when I came across a fruited pudding cake recipe in the Favorite Recipes of America – Desserts cookbook from 1968.  The original recipe calls for “any fruit, fresh or canned”, so I figured “Why not rhubarb?”  As sweet as this is, I think you’d need to cut back on the sugar for a sweeter fruit.  Even with the rhubarb I will probably cut back a bit next time around. Continue reading »

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May 272011
 
Gluten Free Strawberry Rhubarb Crumble with Almond Flour

Since the new crop of rhubarb is coming in, and strawberries will (hopefully) be following soon, I decided to use up some of last year’s rhubarb and strawberries that I had stashed in the freezer.  I’ve really had a taste for a crumble but wanted a recipe that was gluten free, used almond flour and limited refined sugars.  Strangely enough, I didn’t have much luck searching the web, so I decided to cobble together several recipes and see how it worked.  (Perhaps I should have made a cobbler? ;-)

Gluten Free Strawberry Rhubarb Crumble with Almond Flour Continue reading »

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Jul 222009
 

Strawberries and bananas image source http://desktoppub.about.com/

After the currant almond jelly, the next day I dug the strawberries, bananas and rhubarb out of the freezer that I had prepped earlier (but not had time to turn into jam). Thawing, measuring, mixing and cooking commenced, and by the end of the day I had 18 more jars (nine each) of strawberry-rhubarb and strawberry-banana jam.

As I was cooking up the strawberry-banana combo, Duncan stuck his head out of the loft and said, “That smells SO good!” It’s also a great use for overripe bananas. I buy those bags of discounted bananas, but sometimes I don’t have time or opportunity to use them all before they are getting mushy. I peel them, stick them in a baggie, and stuff in the freezer until I need them in a recipe – super easy. Continue reading »

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